Elijah M Mitcham

Male 1832 - 1863  (31 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document


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  • Name Elijah M Mitcham 
    Born 26 Feb 1832  Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Military Enlistment 1 Mar 1862  Athens, Henderson Co., TX Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Co. K , Darnell's Regiment, 18th TX Cavalry Enlisted with his brother Asbury G
    Captured 11 Jan 1863  Fort Hindman, AR Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 4 Mar 1863  Camp Douglas, Chicago, IL Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Pneumonia while a POW - Camp Douglas- in Chicago, IL 
    Buried Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, Cook Co., IL Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Pvt. Elijah M. Mitcham was born in 1832, and enlisted with Darnell's Regiment (CSA) Company K, 18th regiment on March 1, 1862 just days after his 30th birthday.

      He mustered from Athens, Henderson County, TX for a period of 12 months.

      On Jan. 11, 1863, Elijah was captured at Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, AR.

      On Feb. 8, he appears present at Camp Douglas, IL as a prisoner of war.

      March 4, 1863, Elijah is reported dead of Pneumonia at Camp Douglas, IL

      [1]
    • On January 6, 1863, the Union Army ordered Brigadier General Jacob Ammen to take command of Camp Douglas, as Confederate prisoners from the Battle of Stones River were being sent to the camp. About 1,500 poorly clothed and generally physically unfit Confederate prisoners arrived at the camp on January 26, 1863. About 1,300 other prisoners arrived the next day and 1,500 more arrived on January 30, 1863 after the Union Army captured Fort Hindman (Arkansas Post). On February 2, 1863, General Ammen reported that many prisoners were too sick to endure conditions at the camp, but his report did not prompt the army or the War Department to make any immediate improvements at the camp.

      During February 1863, 387 of 3,884 prisoners died. This was the highest mortality rate in any Civil War prison camp for any month of the war. Since the prisoners had just arrived at the camp during the previous few weeks, these prisoners must have been in bad physical condition when they got to Camp Douglas. Temperatures that month reportedly were as low as -20 F (-29 C). Smallpox and other diseases were widespread among these prisoners. By March 1863, nineteen prisoners and nineteen guards had died from the disease. Smallpox later was spread to northern cities and into Virginia by several infected prisoners who traveled through several large cities by train and steamer to City Point, VA for exchange along with many other prisoners. Most of the prisoners were exchanged under this later prisoner cartel by April 3, 1863.

      By April 27, 1863 the final death toll from this group of prisoners was 784. It seems that over 300 deaths must have been covered up at the time, which would have made 784 a significant undercount of prisoner deaths to date. By the time these early 1863 prisoners departed from the camp, sources suggest that actually between 1,400 and 1,700 prisoners likely had died at Camp Douglas.Yet official records showed only 615 prisoner deaths to this date. The majority of the deaths at the camp had been caused by typhoid fever and pneumonia, which in turn had resulted from the condition of prisoners when they arrived plus filth, an inadequate sewer system, bad weather and a lack of sufficient heat and clothing. A few prisoners were wounded or killed by guards who saw them step over the "dead line" near the boundaries of the camp or commit minor offenses but such occurrences actually occurred infrequently. Despite these hardships, survivors from this group of prisoners who wrote about their experiences generally stated that they were treated humanely at Camp Douglas. [2]
    • http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=38134917 [3]
    Person ID I389  Extended Families of Childress
    Last Modified 21 Apr 2019 

    Father Rev. Hezekiah Mitcham,   b. 26 Nov 1800, SC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Dec 1865, Henderson Co., TX Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Mother Mary Clarke,   b. 21 Jun 1805, GA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1881, Malakoff, Henderson Co., TX Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Married 22 Feb 1820  Clarke County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F106  Group Sheet

    Family 1 Sarah Jackson,   b. LA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 3 Jun 1852 
    Children 
     1. Hezekiah Alexander "Uncle Alec" Mitcham, Jr.,   b. 26 Feb 1854,   d. 14 Apr 1929, Malakoff, Henderson Co., TX Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     2. J Wesley Mitcham,   b. Feb 1858, TX Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1902  (Age ~ 45 years)
    Last Modified 21 Apr 2019 
    Family ID F151  Group Sheet

    Family 2 Elizabeth Laner 
    Married 13 Oct 1859 
    Last Modified 21 Apr 2019 
    Family ID F535  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 26 Feb 1832 - Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary Enlistment - 1 Mar 1862 - Athens, Henderson Co., TX Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Pneumonia while a POW - Camp Douglas- in Chicago, IL - 4 Mar 1863 - Camp Douglas, Chicago, IL Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Confederate prisoners at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois
    Confederate prisoners at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois
    Confederate Mound Monument
Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, IL
    Confederate Mound Monument Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, IL
    Confederate Mound is located in Section K, Divisions 1 and 2. The plot contains burials of Confederate dead originally interred in the city cemetery, and in grounds near the hospital at Camp Douglas, a prisoner-of-war camp located in Chicago.

    The end of the Civil War led to the abandonment of Camp Douglas and the transfer of the Confederate dead to Oak Woods Cemetery in 1866. The following year, Oak Woods received the Confederate remains from the City Cemetery. According to contemporary military records, 3,384 bodies from City Cemetery were re-interred at Oak Woods. At the time, no individual headstones marked the location of the graves. As a result, in the late 19th century a number of Confederate associations began fundraising campaigns to erect a memorial to the dead in the cemetery. Their efforts were rewarded when President Grover Cleveland and his entire cabinet attended the dedication of the 40' tall bronze-and-granite monument on May 30, 1895.

    An act of Congress in 1903 provided federal funds for the improvement of Confederate Mound, including the marking of Confederate graves and the raising of the monument and mound. These appropriations led to the placement of six bronze plaques on the monument, which list the names of 4,243 known Confederate soldiers interred here, along with an inscription regarding the funding of the monument.

    Twelve unidentified Union guards who died at Camp Douglas are also interred in the plot. Their graves are marked by individual unknown headstones.
    Oak Woods Cemetery Monument
Chicago, Illinois
    Oak Woods Cemetery Monument Chicago, Illinois
    Tablet #10
    listing E.M. Mitcham Co. K, TX 18th Cav
    Oak Woods Monument - Oak Woods Cemetery
    Oak Woods Monument - Oak Woods Cemetery
    Aerial View

    One section of Oak Woods is known as the "Confederate Mound". A 46-foot monument stands alone, surrounded by cannon and cannonballs. Buried around it are an estimated six thousand soldiers and sailors of the Confederacy.

    Camp Douglas was a prisoner of war internment camp near the 35th-street estate of Stephen Douglas, named for the late senator. Like all P.O.W. camps of its day, it was rife with communicable diseases - smallpox and dysentery. Conditions were appalling, and thousands died. A group of prisoners plotted to escape the camp and capture Chicago for the Confederacy, but were thwarted by Allan Pinkerton. By the end of the war, thousands had died and been buried in the North Side's old City Cemetery.

    Documents
    1850 US Census - TX - Henderson County
    1850 US Census - TX - Henderson County
    Family of Rev. Hezekiah Mitcham
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    Elijah M Mitcham

    Elijah M Mitcham

    Elijah M Mitcham

    Elijah M Mitcham

    Elijah M Mitcham

    Elijah M Mitcham

    Elijah M Mitcham

    Elijah M Mitcham
    James M Mitcham - Bio
    James M Mitcham - Bio
    Lewis Publishing Company. A Memorial and Biographical History of Navarro, Henderson, Anderson, Limestone, Freestone and Leon Counties, Texas. .
    1860 US Census - TX - Henderson County
    1860 US Census - TX - Henderson County
    Family of Elijah M. Mitcham

    Family of George J Mitcham

  • Sources 
    1. [S574] CSA Pay sheets.

    2. [S126] Wikipedia.

    3. [S767] findagrave.com.